IYC impulses: how faith and a successful career go together

4 months ago | nac news | in the group nac.today (English)

In order to be successful you have to be ruthless and selfish. So how does faith fit in there? Stephanie Tritt, a professor of radiology and neuroradiology, gave some thought-provoking impulses on how being a Christian and being a boss can be reconciled.

“It’s up to you! Between career, children, church …” This was the title of a keynote speech followed by a question and answer session during the International Youth Convention 2019 in Düsseldorf (Germany). For the speaker and physician-in-chief Stephanie Tritt one thing is sure: a career and faith fit together wonderfully.

“Of course I align my leadership behaviour on Christian values”—even though one can indeed observe sometimes that it is precisely incorrect behaviour and strong elbows that make people successful. Here are three points why faith is also important for Stephanie Tritt in her profession.

Profession as a vocation—but not as a purpose in life!

What happens when you don’t get the job you want and there are many obstacles in your way? Many things just cannot be planned despite willpower and ambition. That is why it is so important that one’s self-image is not only built on professional success and one’s focus and meaning in life is not only associated with one’s profession. “You can’t take a bank account and a title to the grave,” Tritt says. Faith sharpens one’s perspective for the important and sustainable things.

A place to rest in the career jungle

Faith also helps us to deal with situations in which things are not going well. We can derive comfort and confidence from it. “I include God in my plans and ask Him for help in making decisions,” Dr. Tritt says. Then it is easier to accept if things don’t work out as hoped. “But of course you are not automatically more successful just because you are a believing person,” Tritt admits. “God does not make your career.”

An oasis of peace

Finding time to attend the services especially on Wednesday evenings is not always easy. Stephanie Tritt recommends that you make a point of using the divine services as a respite. “For me it is a time of inner peace,” she says. “Here I can once again focus on that which is essential.” Tritt sees volunteer work in a similar way. It has an enriching effect: “You meet other people and can exchange ideas beyond professional topics. All of this broadens your horizon and is a source of strength.”

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